Why and What We Play

L1020092-1000

There are times when I don’t feel like playing games. There, I said it. But these times quickly pass. There is a good reason why we try to make everything in life a bit more game-like — it’s just more fun that way. Today, we gamers have an impressive array of choices of what type of game to play. There are excellent, stand-out games in just about every category. What we play and when has quite a bit to do with the player’s mood as well as other factors such as how much time is available for play. There are times when we are all charged up and want to drive 200 m.p.h. or take on the whole world in combat. Other times, we are in a more of a quiet mood or feeling a bit down. On a separate note, if you want to learn more about gaming’s role with depression, please watch “Video Games vs Depression” by Danny O’Dwyer on Gamespot. It is educational and makes some interesting observations.

Many factors go into the decision of how we spend our free time. If I have a few minutes to kill while I am waiting for something, for example, I might reach for my iPad or iPhone and play some Facebook Scrabble or The Simpsons Tapped Out. (Yes, I am a little obsessed with these two lately.) But if I have more time and am looking for a more immersive experience I sit in front of my Xbox. As I have mentioned in the past, I very much enjoy the single player modes of a wide variety of game types. Many times when I play this is my first choice. There are so many variations of these single player modes that there is almost no reason to look elsewhere. But limiting your play to single player modes ultimately makes you feel a bit antisocial.

Several of my friends and family members play online multiplayer games nearly exclusively and lately I have been joining in. The difference between playing with strangers and being in a party is night and day. It also typically effects what game you play. Often when I play  Call of Duty Black Ops 2, I play with strangers and usually due to the inane and irritating nature of the chatter, I mute the entire group. Lately, I have found myself with much less interest in leveling up in COD and it is not just due to the ever-increasing lag and tricks, both legal and hacked, that it seems so many players are resorting to these days. There are many reasons why we often focus on a single game for a while until we inevitably burn out on it and move to something else. Personally, my default has always been to play alone due to restrictions in time and interruptions that would ruin a time-sensitive, non-pause-friendly game experience like COD deathmatch.

L1020091-1000Over the last few weeks, I have been playing more with others on Xbox live, especially in parties. Surprisingly, it has not been in COD, but more co-operative games like Borderlands 2 and Left for Dead. Playing with family and friends is a completely different experience than playing with strangers. There is the opportunity for discussions about games or any other subject with people close to you with whom you too often let time just slip by. The connection of party gaming provides a very different type of space where casual conversation can occur naturally. With the reveal of the additional functionality of the new Xbox One, this sphere should become even more immersive. I am definitely looking forward to the addition of Skype and having a Kinect back on my system. I moved our Kinect to the second Xbox as that room had more space to take full advantage of the device and now have to resort to using headphones while playing in parties. I have had many issues with my headphones over the years. Currently, my Turtle Beach EarForce X42s add an irritating echo to anything I say. Others in my party sound fine and do not hear my echo but the result sours the experience. If anyone knows how to correct this problem, please tell me. The Turtle Beach website indicates that this is typically due to issues with the cable or the controller jack. As this happens with any controller, I can only assume that I will be taking these back for a new pair as well.

We have had two Xboxes for a while. We bought our first white Xbox 360 in 2006. Over the years, we have had the red ring of death three times and had each repaired or replaced. The last time it happened was approximately when the new black version of the Xbox debuted and I took the opportunity to purchase a second console. With three boys playing different games, this has proven to be a good investment. Over the past seven years, we have retired two controllers and purchased a few specialty controllers and replaced nearly all of the batteries. This is to be expected as batteries have a limited lifespan and it is hard to complain about replacing controllers that get daily use for four or five years. We definitely got our money’s worth.

Headphones have proven to be a different story. I have purchased all of the headphones that we use from BestBuy and I was lucky to be smart enough at the time to spring for the Black Tie Purchase Protection plan which allows you to swap for the same or equivalent product should you have any issues. This has proven to be invaluable as I have returned three or four pairs of headphones, just about once a year for the last several years. I have had different models from different manufacturers, all of which were highly rated by several sources. Ultimately, every pair developed some irritating problem, often with the microphones. Have you all had similar problems? If you have a solid set of headphones to recommend, please pass it on. I would be very grateful.

One last thing — I just read that the new Xbox One will not be backwardly compatible. While I can understand that the new core architecture doesn’t allow for the playing of Xbox 360 games, it seems more than a little ironic that the new system will replace your cable box and Bluray player, but not your existing game console.

Posted on May 24, 2013, in Family, Gaming and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Pretty section of content. I just stumbled upon your blog and in accession capital to
    assert that I get in fact enjoyed account your blog posts.
    Any way I’ll be subscribing to your feeds and
    even I achievement you access consistently quickly.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: